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Ice Machine Electrical Systems

$90.00

Forget simple on/off switches. Ice machines are the intricate robots of the commercial refrigeration world. This course dives deep into the unique controls that make them tick, knowledge you won’t find with standard refrigeration systems.

HVAC or commercial refrigeration pro? Get ready to expand your expertise. This course focuses on the specialized controls you won’t encounter in your typical service calls.

As an HVACR technician, it is crucial to have a basic understanding of electrical fundamentals. This knowledge and competency will allow you to safely and effectively install, maintain, and repair HVACR systems. Besides the science fundamentals of electricity, the National Electrical Code (NEC) is the standard that governs the installation of electrical systems. Being familiar with the NEC is vital as it will guide safe installations.

As an HVACR technician, it is crucial to have a basic understanding of electrical fundamentals. This knowledge and competency will allow you to safely and effectively install, maintain, and repair HVACR systems. Besides the science fundamentals of electricity, the National Electrical Code (NEC) is the standard that governs the installation of electrical systems. Being familiar with the NEC is vital as it will guide safe installations.

We’ve highlighted some areas focused upon during your training in this course to give you an idea of your upcoming journey.

Did you know that electrical troubleshooting is the primary task of HVACR technicians at trouble calls?

A few of the critical concepts that you must know include:

  • Ohm’s Law states that the current through a conductor is proportional to its voltage.
  • Series and parallel circuits: A series circuit has components connected one after the other, while a parallel circuit has components connected side by side.
  • AC circuits alternate the current direction, while DC circuits have a constant current flow.
  • Transformers: These devices convert AC currents of one voltage to another voltage.
  • Relays: These are switches that are activated by an electromagnet.
  • Measurements of electric power: This includes watts, volts, and amps.
  • The volt is the unit of measurement for electric potential difference, the amp is the unit of electric current, and the watt is the unit of measurement for power.

The Elements of Utility Power Distribution Systems

  • The service entrance is where the utility company’s electricity comes into a building.
  • The meter is used to measure the amount of electricity that is used.
  • The main breaker is a large switch that controls the flow of electricity to the rest of the building.
  • Circuit breakers protect the wiring in a building from excessive current.
  • The service drop is the wire that carries electricity from the utility company’s power lines to the building.
  • The service lateral is the wire that carries electricity from the main breaker to the individual circuits in a building.
  • Ampacity measures how much current a wire can carry without overheating.

Alternative power sources such as solar and wind power are becoming more popular, and HVACR technicians should be familiar with these systems. Solar power systems use photovoltaic panels to convert sunlight into electricity, while wind power systems use turbines to generate electricity from the wind.

As An HVACR Technician, It Is Vital to Be Familiar With Line Power Sources And Handling

  • Three-phase power is another important concept for HVACR technicians to understand. Three-phase power is often used in industrial and commercial settings, providing more power than a single-phase circuit.
  • Single Phase power is the most commonly used type in residential settings. It consists of two hot wires and one neutral wire. The voltage between the hot wire and the neutral wire is 120 volts.
  • Control Circuit Power controls motors, solenoids, and other devices with a pilot duty relay. The voltage for this type of power in the HVACR system is typically 24 volts.
  • DC and AC power are the two types of power that HVACR technicians will encounter. DC power is direct current, meaning the current flows in one direction only. AC power is alternating current, meaning that the current reverses direction periodically. AC power is typically used in households, while DC power is more commonly used in industrial settings.

 

Short Circuits and Overloads

  • A short circuit is a condition with a direct connection between the live wire and the ground. Short circuits can cause an excessive current through a load or conductor that can damage equipment or start a fire.
  • An overload is a condition with too much current flowing through the wires. Overloads can also damage equipment or cause a fire.

Grounding

  • Grounding is a method of protecting people and equipment from electrical shock.
  • There are two types of grounding:
  • Grounding to a water pipe: This is done by connecting a wire from the electrical system to a water pipe.
  • Grounding to the earth: This is done by driving a metal rod into the ground.

Circuit Breakers and Fuses

  • Circuit breakers protect the wiring in a building from excessive current.
  • Fuses protect the wiring in an electrical system from excessive current.

Testing Electrical Systems

  • Testing an electrical system before using it after a short, open, or grounding event is essential.
  • Two types of tests can be performed:
  • Megger test: This test is used to measure the insulation resistance of a system. The megger is generally defined as a maintenance device but is often used as a troubleshooting device.
  • Continuity test: This test is used to check for shorts and breaks in the wires.
  • Voltmeter: This instrument is key to many aspects of circuit tracing.
  • Testing instruments are used to test various aspects of an HVACR system. HVACR technicians will use these instruments to troubleshoot electrical problems.

Electric Motors

  • Learn how motors are built and operated. Motors are devices that use electricity to create mechanical energy. HVACR technicians will often work with motors to control the speed of fans and blowers. The Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) is an essential type of motor for HVACR technicians to be familiar with, as it is more efficient than traditional motors.
  • Compressors are devices that increase the pressure of a gas or liquid. HVACR technicians often work with compressors to move the refrigerant through an air conditioning system. Learn about the different types of compressors and how they work.

Basic Electrical Concepts

  • Electricity is the flow of electrons through a conductor, such as a wire. The flow rate is measured in amperes (amps), and the pressure that drives the flow is measured in volts.
  • HVACR technicians need to be familiar with Ohm’s Law
  • Ohm’s Law states that the current in a circuit is equal to the voltage divided by the resistance. The formula for Ohm’s Law is: I = V/R
  • Where I is current in amperes, V is voltage in volts, and R is resistance in ohms.

Wiring Schematics

Wiring schematics are diagrams that show how an electrical circuit is wired. HVACR technicians often use pictorial and ladder wiring schematics to troubleshoot electrical problems.

Summary

If you’re an HVACR technician, it is crucial to have a basic understanding of electrical fundamentals. This knowledge and competency will allow you to safely and effectively install, maintain, and repair HVACR systems. The National Electrical Code (NEC) is the standard that governs the installation of electrical systems. Being familiar with the NEC is vital as it will guide safe installations.

Key concepts abound in this course, as electricity is not a simple subject! Some key concepts you should know include Ohm’s Law, which states that the current through a conductor is proportional to the voltage applied to it.

Enroll in the eTech HVACR Electrical Fundamentals today!

  • Alternative Power Systems
  • Capacitance
  • DC and AC power
  • Horsepower
  • Ladder and Pictorial Schematics
  • Line Power
  • Load Center
  • Maximum and Minimum Circuit Sizing
  • Overloaded Circuits
  • Power Factor
  • Series and Parallel Circuits
  • Service Factor
  • Short Circuits and Grounded Circuits
  • Single and Three Phase Power
  • Volt, Amp, and Watt

 

Full Course Details

As an HVACR technician, it is crucial to have a basic understanding of electrical fundamentals. This knowledge and competency will allow you to safely and effectively install, maintain, and repair HVACR systems. Besides the science fundamentals of electricity, the National Electrical Code (NEC) is the standard that governs the installation of electrical systems. Being familiar with the NEC is vital as it will guide safe installations.

We’ve highlighted some areas focused upon during your training in this course to give you an idea of your upcoming journey.

Did you know that electrical troubleshooting is the primary task of HVACR technicians at trouble calls?

A few of the critical concepts that you must know include:

  • Ohm’s Law states that the current through a conductor is proportional to its voltage.
  • Series and parallel circuits: A series circuit has components connected one after the other, while a parallel circuit has components connected side by side.
  • AC circuits alternate the current direction, while DC circuits have a constant current flow.
  • Transformers: These devices convert AC currents of one voltage to another voltage.
  • Relays: These are switches that are activated by an electromagnet.
  • Measurements of electric power: This includes watts, volts, and amps.
  • The volt is the unit of measurement for electric potential difference, the amp is the unit of electric current, and the watt is the unit of measurement for power.

The Elements of Utility Power Distribution Systems

  • The service entrance is where the utility company’s electricity comes into a building.
  • The meter is used to measure the amount of electricity that is used.
  • The main breaker is a large switch that controls the flow of electricity to the rest of the building.
  • Circuit breakers protect the wiring in a building from excessive current.
  • The service drop is the wire that carries electricity from the utility company’s power lines to the building.
  • The service lateral is the wire that carries electricity from the main breaker to the individual circuits in a building.
  • Ampacity measures how much current a wire can carry without overheating.

Alternative power sources such as solar and wind power are becoming more popular, and HVACR technicians should be familiar with these systems. Solar power systems use photovoltaic panels to convert sunlight into electricity, while wind power systems use turbines to generate electricity from the wind.

As An HVACR Technician, It Is Vital to Be Familiar With Line Power Sources And Handling

  • Three-phase power is another important concept for HVACR technicians to understand. Three-phase power is often used in industrial and commercial settings, providing more power than a single-phase circuit.
  • Single Phase power is the most commonly used type in residential settings. It consists of two hot wires and one neutral wire. The voltage between the hot wire and the neutral wire is 120 volts.
  • Control Circuit Power controls motors, solenoids, and other devices with a pilot duty relay. The voltage for this type of power in the HVACR system is typically 24 volts.
  • DC and AC power are the two types of power that HVACR technicians will encounter. DC power is direct current, meaning the current flows in one direction only. AC power is alternating current, meaning that the current reverses direction periodically. AC power is typically used in households, while DC power is more commonly used in industrial settings.

 

Short Circuits and Overloads

  • A short circuit is a condition with a direct connection between the live wire and the ground. Short circuits can cause an excessive current through a load or conductor that can damage equipment or start a fire.
  • An overload is a condition with too much current flowing through the wires. Overloads can also damage equipment or cause a fire.

Grounding

  • Grounding is a method of protecting people and equipment from electrical shock.
  • There are two types of grounding:
  • Grounding to a water pipe: This is done by connecting a wire from the electrical system to a water pipe.
  • Grounding to the earth: This is done by driving a metal rod into the ground.

Circuit Breakers and Fuses

  • Circuit breakers protect the wiring in a building from excessive current.
  • Fuses protect the wiring in an electrical system from excessive current.

Testing Electrical Systems

  • Testing an electrical system before using it after a short, open, or grounding event is essential.
  • Two types of tests can be performed:
  • Megger test: This test is used to measure the insulation resistance of a system. The megger is generally defined as a maintenance device but is often used as a troubleshooting device.
  • Continuity test: This test is used to check for shorts and breaks in the wires.
  • Voltmeter: This instrument is key to many aspects of circuit tracing.
  • Testing instruments are used to test various aspects of an HVACR system. HVACR technicians will use these instruments to troubleshoot electrical problems.

Electric Motors

  • Learn how motors are built and operated. Motors are devices that use electricity to create mechanical energy. HVACR technicians will often work with motors to control the speed of fans and blowers. The Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) is an essential type of motor for HVACR technicians to be familiar with, as it is more efficient than traditional motors.
  • Compressors are devices that increase the pressure of a gas or liquid. HVACR technicians often work with compressors to move the refrigerant through an air conditioning system. Learn about the different types of compressors and how they work.

Basic Electrical Concepts

  • Electricity is the flow of electrons through a conductor, such as a wire. The flow rate is measured in amperes (amps), and the pressure that drives the flow is measured in volts.
  • HVACR technicians need to be familiar with Ohm’s Law
  • Ohm’s Law states that the current in a circuit is equal to the voltage divided by the resistance. The formula for Ohm’s Law is: I = V/R
  • Where I is current in amperes, V is voltage in volts, and R is resistance in ohms.

Wiring Schematics

Wiring schematics are diagrams that show how an electrical circuit is wired. HVACR technicians often use pictorial and ladder wiring schematics to troubleshoot electrical problems.

Summary

If you’re an HVACR technician, it is crucial to have a basic understanding of electrical fundamentals. This knowledge and competency will allow you to safely and effectively install, maintain, and repair HVACR systems. The National Electrical Code (NEC) is the standard that governs the installation of electrical systems. Being familiar with the NEC is vital as it will guide safe installations.

Key concepts abound in this course, as electricity is not a simple subject! Some key concepts you should know include Ohm’s Law, which states that the current through a conductor is proportional to the voltage applied to it.

Enroll in the eTech HVACR Electrical Fundamentals today!

  • Alternative Power Systems
  • Capacitance
  • DC and AC power
  • Horsepower
  • Ladder and Pictorial Schematics
  • Line Power
  • Load Center
  • Maximum and Minimum Circuit Sizing
  • Overloaded Circuits
  • Power Factor
  • Series and Parallel Circuits
  • Service Factor
  • Short Circuits and Grounded Circuits
  • Single and Three Phase Power
  • Volt, Amp, and Watt

 

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